Category Archives: Over-the-Rhine Blog

Second Annual Cincideutsch Christkindlmarkt Expands to Findlay Market

Inspired by a centuries-old custom originating in German-speaking Europe, Cincideutsch will for the second consecutive year bring the Christkindlmarkt tradition to Cincinnati. This year, the holiday market expands from a single weekend to encompass three consecutive weekends (Nov 29–Dec 1 at Fountain Square and Dec 6-8, 13-15 at Findlay Market). Local vendors will staff half-timbered booths, offering a large scale of handcrafted gifts, unique collectibles, seasonal decorations, traditional holiday sweets, beer, Glühwein (hot spiced wine) and other hot beverages.

2012 Cincideutsch Christkindlmarkt

2012 Cincideutsch Christkindlmarkt

The Cincideutsch Christkindlmarkt is solely run by volunteers, who do everything from construct booths, to acquire sponsorship, to staff the booths during the event.

The Cincideutsch Christkindlmarkt is solely run by volunteers, who do everything from construct booths, to acquire sponsorship, to staff the booths during the event.

“There are plenty of Oktoberfests here in town, but I always saw the need for an authentic German Christmas market,” says Cincideutsch President and Co-Founder, Olaf Scheil, a native of Lübeck, Germany. “The Christkindlmarkt is a tradition that is hundreds of years old and such an integral part of German culture still today. And the Cincideutsch Christkindlmarkt is just like those found all over Germany—a place for people to gather with family and friends, enjoy the seasonal weather and celebrate the holidays.”

German Gift Items

Traditional German gift items will be available for purchase.

The market will have traditional German Foods, including pretzels and stollen.

The market will have traditional German Foods, including pretzels and stollen.

Although the Cincideutsch Christkindlmarkt strives to ensure an experience that rivals that of a trip overseas, room always remains for Cincinnati’s culture to shine through. Once the market is moved from Fountain Square to Findlay Market, the Over-the Rhine Brewery District will hold tours on Saturdays at 1pm that explore Over-the-Rhine as was a port-of-entry for immigrants seeking opportunity in a new land. The tours, which are available for $15, will visit three pre-Prohibition breweries, including underground lagering cellars. Additionally, the Cincideutsch Christkindlmarkt at Findlay Market will feature a one-of-a-kind entertainment schedule. Brass music will be performed by the Ohio River Brass Quintet, the Blechbläser Zinzinnati, and song provided by the Kolping Saengerchor, the Fairview German School Kinderchor (children’s choir), and the Young Professionals Choral Collective (YPCC). Free holiday crafts will also for families during scheduled times.

The Kolping Saengerchor at the 2012 Cincideutsch Christkindlmarkt. Opening ceremonies to be held at 11am on Saturday, November 30, 2013.

The Kolping Saengerchor, who performed at the 2012 Cincideutsch Christkindlmarkt, will return for a second year, bringing traditional German song to Findlay Market.

For more details about the Cincideutsch Christkindlmarkt and its full entertainment schedule, visit markt.cincideutsch.com. News updates can be found at facebook.com/cincideutschmarkt and Twitter @cincideutsch. Vendor opportunities are available at Findlay Market (Dec 6-8, 13-15). Please contact info@cincideutsch.com for more information.

Along with presenting sponsor, Christian Moerlein Brewing Company, the Christkindlmarkt is graciously funded through gifts from Siemens, The Audi Connection, UBS Financial Services, The German Consulate General-Chicago, Ruthman Companies, Seemless Printing and private donors.

 

 

Cincy Streetcar: Town Hall Meeting Tonight 11/14 – 7pm

Group holds town hall meeting to discuss options and next steps for finishing the Cincinnati Streetcar

Who: Small group of concerned citizens, activists, and elected officials.

What: A town hall meeting to discuss the repercussions of Mayor-elect John Cranley’s opposition to the Cincinnati Streetcar.

Event will feature a presentation on the history of Cincinnati transit, as well as a Q&A session to promote a dialogue about various topics, including:

THE PEOPLE: How can residents and business owners open a dialogue regarding the ramifications of cancelling the streetcar?

THE PROPERTY: Property owners and businesses whom have invested and plan to invest as a result of the streetcar. How does this affect your investments?

THE RAMIFICATIONS: How canceling the streetcar affects the entire city.

THE COST: The group will outline clear objectives and facts surrounding the possible cancelation of the streetcar.

THE CITY: What obligations does the city have to complete what is already 20% project complete and 70% money-committed.

THE PLAN: What we need to do to get our voices heard and keep the conversation on the table.

 

Where: The Mercantile Library, located at 414 Walnut St., Cincinnati, OH 45202

MAP

 

When: Thursday, November 14, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.

Why: To continue an informed dialogue about the positive economic benefits of the twice-voted upon Cincinnati Streetcar.

Parking available at Fountain Square garage, Chiquita Tower and other garage locations along Walnut, Main and Vine St.

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For Media Inquiries, please contact Micah Paldino at micah@makepbj.com or513-621-7676.
 

The Malice Ball

The Inaugural Malice Ball

The Malice Ball is tomorrow at the Christian Moerlein Brewery. Learn more and buy tickets here.

A night of elegant drama filled with twisted energy — a masquerade ball in Over-the-Rhine like you have never experienced! 
The Christian Moerlein Brewery will be transformed into a mysterious spooky hall to host the inaugural Malice Ball. Transcend into a frightful ambiance and enter a foggy, spectacular underworld. Entertainment includes DJ Matt Joy, dancing, spooky photo booth, makeup and styling by Josie Graham and MUJO, bars staffed by our favorite bartenders from Bakersfield and Japp’s, and a special popup “Thriller” performance by Pones Inc.

Proceeds benefit the OTR Chamber’s Business First Grant.

Malice Ball Masquerade

#maliceball

Malice Ball 2

Pones Inc. rehearsing for "Thriller"

Pones Inc. rehearsing for “Thriller”

 

Final Friday

Three Sure Bets Tonight at Final Friday

Three sure bets for Final Friday:

1. Hello Goodbye | Final Friday: Smartfish Studio and Supply and Rock Paper Scissors are putting on a party in their space at 1301 Main. “Join us for brews by Dave Schuster of Looking Glass Brewing, food by The Belle Jar, and pastries by Brown Bear Bakery!”

Check out Rock Paper Scissors’ indiegogo campaign below:

2. PB&J Final Friday Opening Party & Magazine Launch: PB&J is having an opening party at its new studio at 1417 Main Street to launch its biannual magazine. “Highlights of the Evening: Take Home PB&J Curated Magazine, New Furniture from the Such + Such Collection, Rose Bar, and Complimentary Valet Parking.”

PBJ

3. The Ridges and The Yugos at MOTR: Folk rock and indie bands performing for free (21+) at MOTR Pub, 1345 Main Street

MOTR

The “movers and shakers” of the Germania Society’s first Oktoberfest. Photo courtesy of The Germania Society.

Oktoberfest: An Authentically German-American Tradition

Written by Lisa K. Bambach, Cincideutsch

Beginning August 23, Cincinnati will kick off its most vibrant festival season. Every weekend through mid-October, blue and white checkered flags will be hoisted, wurst will be sizzling on the grill, taps will be flowing with malty Bavarian-style lagers, and polka music will become commonplace. Cincinnati will be transformed into Oktoberfest City, USA.

Fountain Square overflows with members of the German community prior to the opening keg tapping ceremony at the 2012 Zinzinnati Oktoberfest. © 2012 Lisa K. Bambach

Fountain Square overflows with members of the German community prior to the opening keg tapping ceremony at the 2012 Zinzinnati Oktoberfest. © 2012 Lisa K. Bambach

 

A NEW GERMAN LEGACY

When thinking of Cincinnati’s German heritage, first to mind might be the waves of immigrants during the 1800s who brought with them the rich traditions that defined the community of Over-the-Rhine. You might think of the local brewing industry’s heyday, the rise of the singing festivals that led to the founding of the May Festival and the construction of Music Hall, the beginnings of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra at Wielert’s Pavilion, and the craftsmen who laid the brick and carved the wood that still stand in what remains the largest historic district in the United States. However, if you attribute the introduction of Oktoberfest to this era, you would be mistaken.

Oktoberfest in Cincinnati was not established until the latest great wave of immigrants—that of our parents’ and grandparents’ generation. They came to the city in the 1940s and 1950s after the second World War in search of new beginnings. By that time, Cincinnati had abandoned affiliation with its German traditions that had been established in the 1800s. Street and business names had been changed to sound more American after World War I, the language was no longer heavily taught in schools, and the majority of local German news publications were all but gone. In order to hold on to the culture they had grown up with, Cincinnati’s new German community began to form organizations wherein they could socialize and pass down their traditions to their children. The Verein der Donauschwaben was established in 1954 by Central Europeans (Hungary, Yugoslavia, Romania) of German descent to preserve their unique heritage, and in 1964, the Germania Society of Cincinnati was created, welcoming all of German descent.

Cover of the 1982 Oktoberfest booklet published by the Germania Society, displaying the organization’s crest. © 2013 Lisa K. Bambach

Cover of the 1982 and 2004 Oktoberfest booklets published by the Germania Society, displaying the organization’s crest. © 2013 Lisa K. Bambach

 

CINCINNATI’S ORIGINAL OKTOBERFEST
Germania Oktoberfest | August 23-25, 2013

The Germania Society was the first to bring Oktoberfest to Cincinnati in 1971. For almost 10 years, members of the organization hosted dances and dinners in Clifton, Cheviot, and various other locations throughout the city, but they were determined to establish their own club house. To do this, members needed a fundraiser that would be able to finance the construction of such a building, the 25 acres of land that it would be situated upon, and the activities they wished to offer to create a true community center.

George Westendorf became the first chairman of the fundraiser’s committee. He traveled with his wife Maria Westendorf and Fred Mause to observe Milwaukee’s Germanfest. Upon their return to Cincinnati, they concluded that an Oktoberfest-style celebration would be an ideal fundraiser and proceeded to meet every two weeks in the Westendorf family’s basement to plan the event. The meetings themselves contained as much enthusiasm and merriment as the event itself. “They banged their glasses so hard on my table when they were planning the whole thing, that they ruined it! I had to get a new one after the festival,” exclaimed Maria with a smile.

The “movers and shakers” of the Germania Society’s first Oktoberfest. Photo courtesy of The Germania Society.

The “movers and shakers” of the Germania Society’s first Oktoberfest. Photo courtesy of The Germania Society.

George Westendorf (left) was the first chairman of the Germania Society’s Oktoberfest committee. Photo courtesy of The Germania Society

George Westendorf (left) was the first chairman of the Germania Society’s Oktoberfest committee. Photo courtesy of The Germania Society

In the fall of that year, Germania members marched in a parade from the Cheviot Field House to the Harvest Home Park to celebrate the opening of their festival. The inaugural event, however, did not go off without a hitch. Cincinnati’s own enthusiasm for the event was underestimated. “We sold out of all of our food on the first day,” explained Maria. “Edelmann’s sausage opened the factory through the night and called in all of his workers so we would have food the next day. And I drove around the city with all of the ladies in the club to buy bread. I bet no Kroger in the city had rye bread on their shelves after we were through.”

The mayor of Cheviot joined in the opening parade of each Oktoberfest celebration. Photo courtesy of The Germania Society

The mayor of Cheviot joined in the opening parade of each Oktoberfest celebration. Photo courtesy of The Germania Society

Oktoberfest was originally held at Harvest Home Park in the City of Cheviot. Photo courtesy of The Germania Society

Oktoberfest was originally held at Harvest Home Park in the City of Cheviot. Photo courtesy of The Germania Society

 

SHARING OUR TRADITIONS
Donauschwaben Oktoberfest | October 4-6, 2013 

Forty-two years later, one cannot define Cincinnati without mention of Oktoberfest. The city now touts more than 10 different celebrations, including the second largest Oktoberfest in the world which opens the same weekend as the original in Munich.

John Weissmann of the Cincinnati Donauschwaben Society (Verein der Donauschwaben) describes the Oktoberfest celebrations hosted by cultural organizations like Germania and Donauschwaben as “good representations of actual German tradition—often at times more so than what you’ll find in Germany today.” The events have not been commercialized and continue to be run by the families of each organization. “Our food is still Schwaben-made. The recipes we use were brought over by our families from the Old Country and passed down to us and our kids. Everything from the goulasch to the stuffed cabbage to the sausage and desserts. Even the chicken and pigs we roast are roasted by our members.”

Members of Donauschwaben celebrating Oktoberfest at the club house. © 2012 Lisa K. Bambach

Members of Donauschwaben celebrating Oktoberfest at the club house. © 2012 Lisa K. Bambach

Members of Donauschwaben celebrating Oktoberfest at the club house. © 2012 Lisa K. Bambach

Members of Donauschwaben celebrating Oktoberfest at the club house. © 2012 Lisa K. Bambach

 

Freshly roasted pig and chicken at the Donauschwaben Oktoberfest. © 2012 Lisa K. Bambach

Freshly roasted pig and chicken at the Donauschwaben Oktoberfest. © 2012 Lisa K. Bambach

Unique to the Donauschwaben celebration is the all-German entertainment schedule and extensive beer selection, where over 20 different options ranging from imports to Cincinnati craft brews are on tap. Musicians are invited to perform from Germany and Austria and “we have five groups of dancers in Donauschwaben,” John explains. “They are the spotlight after our opening ceremony, ranging in age from 4 to over 80. From when you can start dancing until you can’t anymore.”

Nick Abt performs the Schuhplattler—one of 5 dance groups at the Donauschwaben Society. Photo courtesy of the Cincinnati Donauschwaben Society

Nick Abt performs the Schuhplattler—a Bavarian-style dance performed by one of 5 dance groups at the Donauschwaben Society. Photo courtesy of the Cincinnati Donauschwaben Society

Each year, Germania opens the Oktoberfest season during the last weekend of August and Donauschwaben holds their family-friendly festival during the first weekend of October. “It’s is our biggest fundraiser of the year,” states John. “It’s our operation costs, our dance groups, our language school, our exchange programs— It’s what keeps our community thriving.”

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For more information, please visit the following links:

List of Oktoberfest celebrations 
German community events (year-round)
Images of Oktoberfest 2012